Bonding

Fostering Social and Emotional Health through Pediatric Primary Care: Common Threads to Transform Everyday Practice and Systems

With support from the Pediatrics Supporting Parents (PSP) funder collaborative, the Center for the Study of Social Policy (CSSP) studied ways that pediatric primary care could promote positive outcomes around social and emotional development, the parent-child relationship, and parents’ mental health. This report synthesizes 3 categories of action and 14 common practices as well as recommendations for systemic reform.

The Science of Relationships

Dr. Martha G. Welch, of Columbia University Irving Medical Center, explains that emotional connection between two people is not a mental process alone. It involves “gut brain” signaling cues from the body up to the brain. We learn how to relate starting in the womb, as the mother’s and baby’s bodies influence and regulate each other. Dr. Welch shares research on the neurobiological basis behind relationship formation.

Building Relationships: Framing Early Relational Health

This strategic brief, produced by the Center for the Study of Social Policy (CSSP) in collaboration with the FrameWorks Institute, offers a comprehensive framing strategy for Early Relational Health (ERH). An expanded focus on early relationships within the child health sector provides a wide-scale opportunity to translate the science about relationships into new practices that can ultimately improve greater population and individual wellbeing.

Calming Cycle Theory

This article in Acta Paediatrica by Martha G. Welch, MD, Director of the Nurture Science Program, explains Calming Cycle Theory. According to this theory, in utero baby and mother establish an emotional connection and visceral/autonomic co‐regulation. After birth, sensory stimulation (such as touch and scent exchange) and emotional communication (such as eye contact and speaking in the mother’s native language) lead to an autonomic response on sensory contact. The result is that mother and infant mutually calm and are attracted to one another.

Learning to Read at 50

How crucible moments, including the COVID-19 pandemic, help us see our humanity and ourselves in a new light.

A Season of Giving

Even if we aren’t together in person for the holidays, we can connect with each other emotionally.

Gratitude and Connection

When we gather with family and friends to give thanks – even when apart – we can incorporate activities that help us connect to each other.

You’ll Never Walk Alone

Emotional connection between parents & children helps us build relationships throughout our lives with empathy, mutuality, and reciprocity.

Bridging

Foundations for Young Adult Success

Jan 1, 2022|0 Comments

This comprehensive report offers wide-ranging evidence to show what young people need to develop from preschool to young adulthood to succeed in college and career, have healthy relationships, be engaged citizens, and make wise choices. It concludes that rich experiences combining action and reflection supported by consistent, supportive relationships help children develop a set of critical skills, attitudes, and behaviors.

Building

Stretching towards Hope in 2022

Apr 4, 2022|0 Comments

2021 brought forth many of the same challenges we’d already been grappling with as a country, along with new ones. Social upheaval, political unrest, and the continued impact of the pandemic aggravate our existing fear, anxiety, and loneliness.

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How Gen Z Sees Themselves and Their Future

Jul 7, 2022|0 Comments

Gen Z is considered to be the most ethnically and racially diverse generation in American history. So, what are their goals for the next stage of their personal and professional lives? What do they expect from older generations, institutions, and society at large? Check out the new research by Murmuration and the Walton Family Foundation to learn more about Gen Z’s values, priorities, political activity, and interests.

Releasing the Potential of Philanthropic Collaborations

Apr 4, 2022|0 Comments

Over the past decade, philanthropic collaboration has entered a new era of popularity and ambition. Driven by institutional and high-net-worth funders seeking greater impact by acting collectively and by leaders challenging traditional ways of working, the number of collaborative giving platforms has grown. With over $2 billion flowing annually to funder collaboratives working on a range of social, economic, and environmental issues—and that’s just from the funds who responded to the survey—The Bridgespan Group’s recent study sheds light on the changing landscape of these philanthropic partnerships.

Emotional Connection

Jan 1, 2022|0 Comments

The Nurture Science Program (NSP) at Columbia University Medical Center focuses on a new, evidence-based understanding of the critical role emotional connection plays in healthy child development. Emotional connection describes a mutually positive nurturing relationship between parent and child that is crucial to modulating and regulating emotions, learning, and behavior.

Untethered: A Primer on Social Isolation

Jan 1, 2022|0 Comments

Untethered provides a cogent overview of the causes, consequences, and varieties of social isolation, weaving together insights from a range of disciplines. The primer also describes a variety of domains in which constructive and creative action is taking shape, including the built environment, technology, and civic engagement.

Fostering Social and Emotional Health through Pediatric Primary Care: Common Threads to Transform Everyday Practice and Systems

Jan 1, 2022|0 Comments

With support from the Pediatrics Supporting Parents (PSP) funder collaborative, the Center for the Study of Social Policy (CSSP) studied ways that pediatric primary care could promote positive outcomes around social and emotional development, the parent-child relationship, and parents’ mental health. This report synthesizes 3 categories of action and 14 common practices as well as recommendations for systemic reform.

The Science of Relationships

Jan 1, 2022|0 Comments

Dr. Martha G. Welch, of Columbia University Irving Medical Center, explains that emotional connection between two people is not a mental process alone. It involves “gut brain” signaling cues from the body up to the brain. We learn how to relate starting in the womb, as the mother’s and baby’s bodies influence and regulate each other. Dr. Welch shares research on the neurobiological basis behind relationship formation.

Building Relationships: Framing Early Relational Health

Jan 1, 2022|0 Comments

This strategic brief, produced by the Center for the Study of Social Policy (CSSP) in collaboration with the FrameWorks Institute, offers a comprehensive framing strategy for Early Relational Health (ERH). An expanded focus on early relationships within the child health sector provides a wide-scale opportunity to translate the science about relationships into new practices that can ultimately improve greater population and individual wellbeing.

Calming Cycle Theory

Jan 1, 2022|0 Comments

This article in Acta Paediatrica by Martha G. Welch, MD, Director of the Nurture Science Program, explains Calming Cycle Theory. According to this theory, in utero baby and mother establish an emotional connection and visceral/autonomic co‐regulation. After birth, sensory stimulation (such as touch and scent exchange) and emotional communication (such as eye contact and speaking in the mother’s native language) lead to an autonomic response on sensory contact. The result is that mother and infant mutually calm and are attracted to one another.

Foundations for Young Adult Success

Jan 1, 2022|0 Comments

This comprehensive report offers wide-ranging evidence to show what young people need to develop from preschool to young adulthood to succeed in college and career, have healthy relationships, be engaged citizens, and make wise choices. It concludes that rich experiences combining action and reflection supported by consistent, supportive relationships help children develop a set of critical skills, attitudes, and behaviors.

Do Americans Really Care For Each Other? What Unites Us—And What Divides Us

Dec 12, 2021|0 Comments

This report from Making Caring Common, published in 2021, offers a data-driven overview of the state of caring in America. There are hopeful and disconcerting findings. Americans value caring, engage in caring acts, and feel connected across the political divide, but most people don’t engage in “harder forms of caring”.